Hyperthyroidism-What You Need to Know

According to our research at the National Metabolic and Longevity Research Center, a healthy thyroid produces hormones that control a person’s metabolic rate. In essence, the thyroid acts as the body’s gas pedal. An overactive or hyperthyroid causes the body’s systems to run too hot and too fast. An under-active or hypothyroid causes the body’s systems to run too cold and too slow. The effects of low thyroid and low body temperature can be devastating because for every one degree decrease in body temperature the base metabolic rate decreases by approximately 6%.

It is not uncommon for a person to have an average temperature that is two to four degrees below normal, this correlates to a 12%-24% reduction in overall metabolism. No wonder these people feel tired and depressed and are consistently challenged with their weight.

Hypothyroidism is a common health condition affecting millions of men and women (more women than men)that is frequently overlooked in our health care system. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) estimates that 10% of Americans – more than the number of Americans with diabetes and cancer combined – suffer from thyroid disease.

The bottom line is that millions of Americans are hypothyroid, many hypothyroid patients receive inadequate treatment, and millions more are hypothyroid and may never even know.

Fatigue is one of the most common reasons for visits to primary care doctors, but the risk factors of having a poorly active thyroid are varied, and include: auto immune disease, post-partum depression, infertility, multiple miscarriages, pms (the previous 5 are specific to women only), weakness, problems with skin or hair, lethargy, sensation of cold, impaired memory or mood, constipation, weight gain or loss, muscle/joint pain, emotional instability, swelling around eyes, face or legs, nervousness, depression, heart palpitations, fullness in the throat area or difficulty swallowing, and much more.

Comments are closed.